For students admitted from AY2021-22

The General Education (GE) framework was reviewed and reformed to ensure that the GE curriculum continues to provide a unique and relevant learning experience for students to thrive in today’s rapidly-changing world. In addition, NUS hopes to offer a more flexible and tailor-made GE experience for students with diverse disciplinary backgrounds.

With effect from AY2021-22, the enhanced General Education curriculum consists of 6 pillars:

  • Cultures and Connections
  • Critique and Expression
  • Data Literacy
  • Digital Literacy
  • Singapore Studies
  • Communities and Engagement (will be offered from AY2022-23)

The first two pillars together compose a ‘Generalist Core’ that emphasizes and seeks to cultivate intelligences, while the third and fourth pillars are essential 21st-Century competencies, and the fifth and sixth pillars bring these intelligences and competencies into deep contact with communities.
pillar

Each General Education Module (GEM) carries 4 Modular Credits (MCs). To satisfy the University Level Requirements for General Education, students are required to read one GEM from each pillar (Total: 24 MCs).

Students from NUS College of Humanities and Sciences, Faculty of Engineering and School of Design and Environment will satisfy GE requirements with modules within their core curriculum where possible. For the GE pillar(s) not satisfied within the core curriculum, students are required to read one GE module from the outstanding GE Pillar(s).

Students who are enrolled in the University Scholars Programme (USP), University Town College Programme (UTCP), or Ridge View Residential College Programme (RVRC) may not be required to read all six GE pillars. For the GE pillar(s) not satisfied within these programmes, students are required to read one GE module from the outstanding GE Pillar(s).

Students are strongly advised to read the FAQ for more information on General Education Requirements.

A short description of each pillar is provided below.

Please click here to view the module trailers.

The Cultures and Connections pillar exposes students to cultural practices across space and time and invites students to unpack the influences, both external and internal, that shape what we do and how we live.

As learning outcomes, students will be able to:

  • Think and respond to local and global issues from a variety of perspectives, and be sensitive to conflicting viewpoints
  • Articulate and defend an intelligent point-of-view on how and why cultures evolve, and how cultures, in turn, shape other aspects of our lives
  • Recognize the influence of cultural practices in their own lives
  • Update and adapt their personal outlook to shifting cultures and norms
This pillar may include modules at higher levels to cater to students who may be interested in a deeper immersion into topics of their choice.

The Critique and Expression pillar aims to develop in students the ability to critique and communicate ideas clearly and in ways sensitive to differing contexts.

As learning outcomes, students will:

  • Develop reflexivity, meta-awareness, and an ability for thoughtful and systematic critique
  • Be able to frame and articulate specific positions through various mediums of communication
  • Acquire the requisite competencies that mark an effective communicator
This pillar may include modules at higher levels to cater to students who may be interested in a deeper immersion into topics of their choice.

The Data Literacy pillar aims to develop in students the ability to transform information into actionable instructional knowledge and practices by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting all types of data.

As learning outcomes, students will:

  • Describe how data are collected and used in diverse societal contexts
  • Understand and interpret the various graphical and textual forms in which data are presented
  • Examine data using the most appropriate tools and theories, including, but not limited to, statistical and analytical techniques; such examination and analysis can be done through the use of statistical software
  • Evaluate the meaning of the results obtained by analyzing the data and evaluate possible consequences and actions
  • Design appropriate data collection and analysis techniques for a given problem
This pillar may include modules at higher levels to cater to students who may be interested in a deeper immersion into topics of their choice.
The Digital Literacy Pillar enables students to learn how computational methods or tools can be used to formulate, solve and analyze problems. It also offers students an appreciation of the potential and limitations of digital methods or tools.

As learning outcomes, students will:

  • Develop the abilities and skills to digitally appraise and manipulate broad classes of problems
  • Develop the abilities and skills to formulate digital solutions to problems, whether they are concrete or abstract
  • Familiarize with methods or tools associated with digital literacy including, but not limited to, computational thinking, artificial intelligence, and algorithms; and, to do so either as a means to formulate solutions to problems or simply as a means of intellectual exploration in multiple fields
This pillar may include modules at higher levels to cater to students who may be interested in a deeper immersion into topics of their choice.
The Singapore Studies Pillar emphasizes a critical understanding of Singapore, its socio-political conventions and institutions, and its future trajectories. It develops insights about the Singapore context and/or how Singapore relates to the region and the world.

As learning outcomes, students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of specific aspects of Singapore, and societal and regional or global awareness
  • Demonstrate cultural and intercultural understanding and collaboration
  • Acquire a sense of belonging and civic-mindedness
The Communities and Engagement Pillar seeks to engage students in thinking deeply about and taking constructive actions to address societal needs and real-world issues such as inequality, poverty, food security, climate change, wildlife conservation and underprivileged/disadvantaged communities.

As learning outcomes, students will:

  • Step out of their immediate identities and self-interested pursuits to cultivate an orientation toward broader social issues
  • Mobilise interdisciplinary and disciplinary perspectives in analysing and understanding the causes and consequences of a problem of interest to them
  • Gather information from primary sources (e.g interviews or field observations) and/or secondary sources (archival or official statistics) in providing empirical evidence to support their proposed solutions
  • Appreciate meaningful partnership with communities