NUS Bulletin AY2021/22

Yale-NUS College

Undergraduate Education

Common Curriculum

Students at Yale-NUS College share one powerful intellectual experience at the heart of their education: they complete an ambitious programme of courses known as the Common Curriculum. This linked set of courses stimulates a community of learning that is centred on fundamental questions in the arts, humanities, social sciences and sciences.

Year 1 Semester 1 – YCC1111 Literature and Humanities 1, YCC1113 Philosophy and Political Thought 1, YCC1121 Comparative Social Inquiry, YCC1122 Quantitative Reasoning and YCC1133 Week 7: Learning Across Boundaries (LAB)

Year 1 Semester 2 – YCC1112 Literature and Humanities 2, YCC1114 Philosophy and Political Thought 2 and YCC1131 Scientific Inquiry 1

Year 2 Semester 1 – YCC2121 Modern Social Thought and YCC2137 Scientific Inquiry 2

Between Year 2 – 4 – 1 Historical Immersion module

By studying these topics together in a structured fashion, students build a common foundation of knowledge that covers many disciplines. They study questions of abiding human interest and of immediate contemporary importance in a deep and sustained manner, and they emerge with a shared set of references, allowing them to fall easily into serious intellectual conversation with one another. In this way, the Common Curriculum creates a lively campus environment of well-informed discussion and debate, which in turn deepens the intellectual development of each student.

Creativity and a sense of wonder are highly prized at Yale-NUS, as are sharp analytic skills and the ability to craft compelling arguments. In each part of the Common Curriculum, students are asked to articulate and defend their positions, beliefs, and assumptions. Through this training, they gain an unusually broad understanding of many fields and a robust confidence in their ability to deploy different modes of thought and analysis. The habits of mind and the intellectual abilities gained through this intense education serve them well as they confront the complex challenges of the 21st century. In addition to the practical benefits that this course of study provides, students often find that a liberal arts and science education offers more personal rewards. It can enrich their inner lives, lead them into friendships different from the ones that they might find elsewhere, and foster their ability to step outside the assumptions of their time and place. The Common Curriculum establishes a broader collegiate environment that helps individuals to cultivate their talents, consider their social responsibilities, and appreciate the humanizing influence of intellectual inquiry.

Teaching and Learning

In most Common Curriculum courses, weekly lectures offer students a sustained analysis of their topic while small seminars encourage more active learning. The seminars are held twice weekly in groups of 18 students. During those sessions the students may plunge into analyzing a data set or discussing the meaning of a challenging text. They may practice different forms of oral argument, from impromptu spoken responses to prepared presentations. The writing they do may consist of creative essays, research papers, or laboratory reports. Students learn to perform quantitative analysis and assess existing scientific evidence; they practice drawing inferences from data and presenting their findings in clear and effective visual formats, cultivating artistic as well as logical skills.

The Common Curriculum contains a degree of intellectual coherence rarely found in higher education today. The courses are coordinated, and each is carefully designed to challenge students from a wide range of academic and individual backgrounds. Students learn to distinguish distinct modes of inquiry and understanding, discover links between disciplines, and connect these insights to diagnosing and resolving problems of contemporary society.

Week 7: Learning Across Boundaries

More popularly known as “Week Seven”, this learning across boundaries course is a distinctive experiential feature of the Common Curriculum’s first year. Conducted mid-semester over a period of one week, students leave the classroom to share insights gained from field observation or meeting with practitioners in different fields and bring them to bear on contemporary problems. Students sometimes travel overseas to collaborate with international partners and experts.

Week 7 faculty lead broad thematic discussions bridging the sciences, social sciences and humanities, and faculty and students share brief but intense learning experiences that cross disciplinary boundaries and encourage creative thought. The week culminates in a day of presentations and performances demonstrating what has been achieved, and students return to the semester’s work refreshed with a renewed sense of purpose.

For up-to date details, please refer to https://admissions.yale-nus.edu.sg/curriculum/#common-curriculum.

Majors

Yale-NUS College is a dynamic innovation in the world of higher education. Its faculty are continuously engaged in the exciting process of formulating curricula which draws on the best from the tradition of liberal arts and science education, while rethinking old practices in light of pedagogical innovations, advanced learning technologies, and the needs of 21st century students.

The majors offered represent current thinking of the content, structure, and intellectual flavour of disciplinary study. They are unique as they are designed by faculty in collaboration with students. Students who enter the College are more than recipients of an education; they are crucial participants in the development of an education fit for a rapidly changing world.

Each major provides systematic training in a specific academic discipline or interdisciplinary area. Built on a foundation provided by the Common Curriculum, each major is designed to give students ample scope and flexibility to explore their interest in a chosen area of knowledge, while also providing direction and depth to their studies. The planning and selection of a major is guided by close personalized interactions with faculty advisors at Yale-NUS. In establishing the majors and helping each student map a path through them, faculty members consider not only the merits of each programme component, but also the way in which the components work together to build a coherent set of insights, skills, and knowledge for each student.

At the end of the second year, students are invited to select a Major and they will need to read a total of 11 relevant and related courses throughout their third and fourth year of study. Most majors would require  students to complete at least one ‘gateway’ course prior the student’s third year at Yale-NUS.

Every student at Yale-NUS is also required to complete a capstone project as part of the major. The capstone project is a year-long supervised endeavor that will develop initiative and independence in research, and represents two of the 11 courses constituting the major. Students will present the results of their work at the end of the fourth year in presentations to audiences of their peers in the field as well as to faculty and students in other disciplines.

Each major has a support network for students in capstone projects, including faculty-led seminars for sharing work-in-progress, laboratories, studio spaces, and resources for enhancing research presentations. Graduating students will develop self-confidence and skills development that comes from having successfully conducted an independent research inquiry.

For up-to date details, please refer to  https://admissions.yale-nus.edu.sg/curriculum/#majors.

Overview: The Learning Experience

The learning experience at Yale-NUS College is steep and carefully designed, to expose students to a range of core courses while preserving the flexibilities necessary to encourage independent exploration. An emphasis on diverse traditions and perspectives is intentionally woven into the Yale-NUS curriculum, which requires all students to engage with different academic disciplines, multiple traditions and ways of interacting with knowledge. The rigor of the curriculum encourages students to question relentlessly, think broadly, analyse problems judiciously, and most importantly evaluate the consequences.

Teaching takes place primarily in small, seminar-style classes, which emphasise student-led discussions to produce rich, challenging learning experiences. Students’ classroom experiences are augmented by a wide range of co-curricular activities such as internships, study abroad opportunities and participation in student organisations.

The residential college system has proven an ideal context for liberal arts education at Yale and other leading universities in the United States. Yale-NUS College’s full residential programme provides an immersive experience where living and learning are intertwined, and encourages active learning, adaptability and different modes of critical thought. Students will live in and become active members of one of these three residential colleges during their four years in the College. Headed by a Rector and Assistant Dean, each residential college has its own distinctive culture.

The residential curriculum is an intentionally curated sequence of programmes, discussions and activities that students will experience in their four years of campus living, designed to maximise learning, growth and engagement opportunities outside of the formal classroom. Through committed engagement in our residential colleges, students become engaged community members, practise intercultural engagement, and learn the skills of self-care and care for others. Over the course of four years living on campus, the residential curriculum helps cultivate well-rounded graduates ready to tackle today's local and global issues.

For details, please visit https://admissions.yale-nus.edu.sg/why-yale-nus/.

Degrees Offered

The Yale-NUS College offers a full-time, four-year course of study, culminating in either of the following:

  • Bachelor of Arts with Honours
  • Bachelor of Science with Honours

Each student selects a Major from 14 fields of study.

  1. Anthropology
  2. Arts & Humanities
  3. Economics
  4. Environmental Studies
  5. Global Affairs
  6. History
  7. Life Sciences
  8. Literature
  9. Mathematical and Computational Sciences
  10. Philosophy
  11. Philosophy, Politics and Economics
  12. Physical Sciences
  13. Psychology
  14. Urban Studies

Concurrent Degree Programmes

  1. Five-Year Concurrent Degree Programme with Yale School of Public Health
  2. Five-Year Concurrent Degree Programme with Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy
  3. Five-Year Concurrent Degree Programme with NUS School of Computing 

Special Programmes

  1. Double Degree Programme in Law and Liberal Arts
  2. Silver Scholars Programme with Yale School of Management 
  3. Special Programme with Yale School of the Environment 
  4. Pathway with Duke-NUS Medical School 

Curriculum Structure & Degree Requirements

Common Curriculum

Students at Yale-NUS College share one powerful intellectual experience at the heart of their education: they complete an ambitious programme of courses known as the Common Curriculum. This linked set of courses stimulates a community of learning that is centred on fundamental questions in the arts, humanities, social sciences and sciences.

Year 1 Semester 1 – YCC1111 Literature and Humanities 1, YCC1113 Philosophy and Political Thought 1, YCC1121 Comparative Social Inquiry, YCC1122 Quantitative Reasoning and YCC1133 Week 7: Learning Across Boundaries (LAB)

Year 1 Semester 2 – YCC1112 Literature and Humanities 2, YCC1114 Philosophy and Political Thought 2 and YCC1131 Scientific Inquiry 1

Year 2 Semester 1 – YCC2121 Modern Social Thought and YCC2137 Scientific Inquiry 2

Between Year 2 – 4 – 1 Historical Immersion module

By studying these topics together in a structured fashion, students build a common foundation of knowledge that covers many disciplines. They study questions of abiding human interest and of immediate contemporary importance in a deep and sustained manner, and they emerge with a shared set of references, allowing them to fall easily into serious intellectual conversation with one another. In this way, the Common Curriculum creates a lively campus environment of well-informed discussion and debate, which in turn deepens the intellectual development of each student.

Creativity and a sense of wonder are highly prized at Yale-NUS, as are sharp analytic skills and the ability to craft compelling arguments. In each part of the Common Curriculum, students are asked to articulate and defend their positions, beliefs, and assumptions. Through this training, they gain an unusually broad understanding of many fields and a robust confidence in their ability to deploy different modes of thought and analysis. The habits of mind and the intellectual abilities gained through this intense education serve them well as they confront the complex challenges of the 21st century. In addition to the practical benefits that this course of study provides, students often find that a liberal arts and science education offers more personal rewards. It can enrich their inner lives, lead them into friendships different from the ones that they might find elsewhere, and foster their ability to step outside the assumptions of their time and place. The Common Curriculum establishes a broader collegiate environment that helps individuals to cultivate their talents, consider their social responsibilities, and appreciate the humanizing influence of intellectual inquiry.

Teaching and Learning

In most Common Curriculum courses, weekly lectures offer students a sustained analysis of their topic while small seminars encourage more active learning. The seminars are held twice weekly in groups of 18 students. During those sessions the students may plunge into analyzing a data set or discussing the meaning of a challenging text. They may practice different forms of oral argument, from impromptu spoken responses to prepared presentations. The writing they do may consist of creative essays, research papers, or laboratory reports. Students learn to perform quantitative analysis and assess existing scientific evidence; they practice drawing inferences from data and presenting their findings in clear and effective visual formats, cultivating artistic as well as logical skills.

The Common Curriculum contains a degree of intellectual coherence rarely found in higher education today. The courses are coordinated, and each is carefully designed to challenge students from a wide range of academic and individual backgrounds. Students learn to distinguish distinct modes of inquiry and understanding, discover links between disciplines, and connect these insights to diagnosing and resolving problems of contemporary society.

Week 7: Learning Across Boundaries

More popularly known as “Week Seven”, this learning across boundaries course is a distinctive experiential feature of the Common Curriculum’s first year. Conducted mid-semester over a period of one week, students leave the classroom to share insights gained from field observation or meeting with practitioners in different fields and bring them to bear on contemporary problems. Students sometimes travel overseas to collaborate with international partners and experts.

Week 7 faculty lead broad thematic discussions bridging the sciences, social sciences and humanities, and faculty and students share brief but intense learning experiences that cross disciplinary boundaries and encourage creative thought. The week culminates in a day of presentations and performances demonstrating what has been achieved, and students return to the semester’s work refreshed with a renewed sense of purpose.

For up-to date details, please refer to https://admissions.yale-nus.edu.sg/curriculum/#common-curriculum.

Majors

Yale-NUS College is a dynamic innovation in the world of higher education. Its faculty are continuously engaged in the exciting process of formulating curricula which draws on the best from the tradition of liberal arts and science education, while rethinking old practices in light of pedagogical innovations, advanced learning technologies, and the needs of 21st century students.

The majors offered represent current thinking of the content, structure, and intellectual flavour of disciplinary study. They are unique as they are designed by faculty in collaboration with students. Students who enter the College are more than recipients of an education; they are crucial participants in the development of an education fit for a rapidly changing world.

Each major provides systematic training in a specific academic discipline or interdisciplinary area. Built on a foundation provided by the Common Curriculum, each major is designed to give students ample scope and flexibility to explore their interest in a chosen area of knowledge, while also providing direction and depth to their studies. The planning and selection of a major is guided by close personalized interactions with faculty advisors at Yale-NUS. In establishing the majors and helping each student map a path through them, faculty members consider not only the merits of each programme component, but also the way in which the components work together to build a coherent set of insights, skills, and knowledge for each student.

At the end of the second year, students are invited to select a Major and they will need to read a total of 11 relevant and related courses throughout their third and fourth year of study. Most majors would require  students to complete at least one ‘gateway’ course prior the student’s third year at Yale-NUS.

Every student at Yale-NUS is also required to complete a capstone project as part of the major. The capstone project is a year-long supervised endeavor that will develop initiative and independence in research, and represents two of the 11 courses constituting the major. Students will present the results of their work at the end of the fourth year in presentations to audiences of their peers in the field as well as to faculty and students in other disciplines.

Each major has a support network for students in capstone projects, including faculty-led seminars for sharing work-in-progress, laboratories, studio spaces, and resources for enhancing research presentations. Graduating students will develop self-confidence and skills development that comes from having successfully conducted an independent research inquiry.

For up-to date details, please refer to  https://admissions.yale-nus.edu.sg/curriculum/#majors.

Special Programmes

The World Is the Campus

The Centre for International & Professional Experience (CIPE) is the Yale-NUS student’s gateway to the world. Through the Centre, students will be able to identify and pursue learning opportunities that are aligned with their academic pursuits, broaden their perspectives, and hone the skills they need to succeed as today’s students and tomorrow’s leaders. The Centre will also bring the world to Yale-NUS’s doorstep, arranging for innovative leadership programming, inviting distinguished visitors across disciplines, and hosting signature events that will afford students a kaleidoscope of perspectives for framing their education and envisioning their future plans.

Taking the Yale-NUS Education on the Road

Linking learning and living is an integral part of a Yale-NUS education, and CIPE will offer an array of opportunities for students to extend their learning beyond the classroom and sharpen their education on the edges of the real world. The Centre and its dedicated team of advisors will work with every Yale-NUS student from his or her arrival on campus to identify and pursue learning opportunities that are aligned with personal values and development goals, offering programming and services in the following areas:

  • Leadership Training and Development
  • Service Learning and Civic Engagement
  • International Summer Sessions
  • Language and Cultural Immersion Programmes
  • Internships and Fellowships
  • Research Attachments
  • Study Abroad and Exchange
  • Career Development and Placement Support
  • Graduate and Professional School Advising
  • Alumni Career Support

CIPE advisors, familiar with assessment and self-reflection tools, will provide support for navigating these opportunities, help students identify areas for improvement and connect each student with the best matches for maximizing their growth. Emphasis will be placed on transformative experiences that might shape one’s academic interests, influence one’s career path, and allow students to explore and go beyond their comfort zones. The Centre will offer guidance in how to choose the right opportunity and support for each student’s intellectual, professional, and personal development during and after the experience.

Gaining an International Perspective

Students have the opportunity to gain international perspectives by participating in programming such as:

  • Interning with a leading Singaporean or multinational company or with a regional NGO.
  • Studying abroad at a wide variety of partner institutions and programmes across Asia, Europe, the Americas and beyond.
  • Participating in innovative signature offerings such as Social Impact Bootcamp and the Entrepreneurship Bootcamp which offers hands-on experience and training with trained practitioners on converting ideas into an actual business.
  • Taking part in a wide range of summer language, arts, and other academic programmes at institutions around the world.

Admissions

Information on Yale-NUS College Admissions can be found here.

 

Financial Matters

For details on financial matters, please visit https://admissions.yale-nus.edu.sg/financial-matters/.