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4.1.2    Degree Requirements

Ph.D. students admitted to the Department of Computer Science (CS) will follow the structure for the CS Ph.D. programme:

Structure of Programme (Computer Science)
Year 1 Semester 1 2 graduate modules +   CS6101 (Exploration of CS Research)
Semester 2 2 graduate modules + Research
Year 2 Semester 1 2 graduate modules + QE
Semester 2 Research
Year 3 Semester 1 Research + Thesis Proposal + Doctoral Seminar
Semester 2 Research
Year 4 Semester 1 Research
Semester 2 Ph.D. Defense (Seminar Presentation + Oral Defense)

CS Ph.D. candidates who are required to complete six graduate modules (24 modular credits) will need to take at least one module each in any three of the five clusters – Algorithm and Theory, Computer Systems, Knowledge Systems, Media Technologies or Programming Language and Software Engineering. Out of the six graduate modules, at least three (12 modular credits) must be at level 6000, and at least another two modules must be at level 5000 (or above). Only a maximum of one level 4000 module is allowed. CS Ph.D. students may take at most two graduate level modules offered by other departments. Students should complete all coursework requirements by the end of third semester.

Ph.D. students admitted to the Department of Information Systems and Analytics (IS) will follow the structure for the IS Ph.D. programme:

Structure of Programme (Information Systems)
Year 1 Semester 1 2 Foundation Modules + 1 Elective Module
Semester 2 2 Foundation Modules + 1 Elective Module + Teaching

Ph.D. Qualifying Examination (QE)

Year 2 Semester 1 2 Elective Modules + Research + Teaching
Semester 2 2 Elective Modules + Research + Teaching
Year 3 Semester 1 Research + Teaching + Thesis Proposal
Semester 2 Research + Teaching
Year 4 Semester 1 Research
Semester 2 Pre-submission Presentation (before thesis submission)

Ph.D. Defense (Seminar Presentation + Oral Defense)

 

All IS Ph.D. candidates are required to complete four out of five foundation modules (16 modular credits), spanning the different streams of IS research. For students who plan to work on economics of IS, design science, or data mining research, they can take relevant elective modules from the Computer Science or Economics departments in the first year. IS Ph.D. candidates will also have the flexibility to select elective modules (24 modular credits) that are relevant to their own study and research plan. For the elective modules, at least 16 modular credits must be at level 6000, and at least 8 modular credits must be from School of Computing.

All Ph.D. candidates are required to achieve a minimum CAP of 3.5 (B grade) for the modules taken.

All Ph.D. candidates must pass their Qualifying Examination (QE) within 18 months after admission. A maximum of two attempts will be allowed.

The Ph.D. Qualifying Examination for IS Ph.D. students will be assessed through the Graduate Research Paper (GRP) after their first year of Ph.D. study. The GRP should highlight the importance and novelty of the proposed research problem, and demonstrates sufficient knowledge of related literature and research methods, with the potential of publications in top journals or conferences.

Ph.D. students taking the CS QE are evaluated based on a research-based paper which should contain critical review of research papers and demonstrates problem-solving abilities of the student, both assigned by the student’s supervisor. The QE paper will be assigned according to one of the six research clusters for evaluation (Algorithms and Theory, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Systems, Database and Data Mining, Media or Programming Languages and Software Engineering). Students will be required to give a presentation to the panel.

All students’ Thesis Advisory Committee (TAC) will be set up after passing the QE, and the student should present his/her research to the TAC. This is to ensure that the TAC is in touch with the student’s research progress.

By end of Year 3, candidates are expected to complete their thesis proposal. The thesis proposal should highlight the significance of the research topic, its goal, the approach adopted, and work to be done. It should be precise and convincing to the examiners that the candidate is proposing a novel area of research and the goal is achievable. The thesis proposal comprises of an open seminar presentation (doctoral seminar), followed by a close-door oral examination.

 

Duration of Programme

The following maximum candidature periods are inclusive of periods of approved study leave:

  • Masters: 36 months
  • Ph.D.: 60 months