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C    Communications and New Media

Current transformations in human society are catalysed by the advent of digital communication technologies. Digital media, from Facebook to Snapchat to Weibo have conceptually and formatively transformed political, economic, social, and cultural systems, bringing about rapid changes in how we communicate, the identities we form, the ways we relate to each other, the groups we belong to, how we connect with each other, and the ways in which we participate in our communities. Communication lies at the heart of these transformation processes taking place globally, shaping human interaction, perception, and engagement, and in turn, bringing about rapid and dramatic changes to how we see ourselves in the world, how we work, form relationships, and play. The next generation of societal transformation and global sustenance are firmly anchored in The strategic uses of new media can address these challenges and open up new opportunities to create new imaginations for  social life, health and well-being, and planetary sustainability.

Today’s digital environment calls for a fundamental change in how we educate the next generation of professionals. Digital technologies are ubiquitous across a wide range of industries including news; entertainment; social media; advertising; public relations; technology; finance; healthcare; education; retail; food and beverage; tourism; fashion; real estate; manufacturing; energy; and transportation, often blurring the lines between these industries. Moreover, governments are increasingly grappling with strategies to prepare for the global digital transformation, educating the workforce, critically and systematically analysing the trends, and developing both policy-based and programmatic solutions that are responsive to these transformations. Similarly, a plethora of civil society organisations, social movements, and community groups are looking for strategies to effectively leverage new media. The transformed landscape of media industries means that local, regional, and global media companies are seeking communication, technology, and media professionals who can not only perform the duties of a communication professional (such as journalist, copywriter, script writer, producer, designer, public relations manager, advertising practitioner), but who are also equipped with visual design; content production for digital media—e.g., online publications, blogs, podcasts virtual communities, interactive advertising; and strategic management of digital communication.

The Department of Communications and New Media (CNM) is ranked among the top communications departments globally, and is the only department across Asia which offers media studies, interactive media design, cultural studies, and communication management with a focus on new media. CNM educates and nurtures future communication, management, media, art, design, finance, policy, civil society, health, and political communication professionals using an integrated and multidisciplinary approach that reflects today’s connected, converged, rapidly transforming, and multi-platform media environment. Students majoring in CNM can take courses in advertising, journalism, and health communication, and public relations (traditionally offered in communication programmes), art and visual design (traditionally offered in arts programmes), game design and human computer interaction (traditionally offered in computer sciences) within one academic department, crafting programmes of study that are responsive to their strengths and aspirations. Students can also take courses in new media regulation and policy, social psychology, and the culture industries as well as sociology, political science, history, philosophy, computer sciences and business.

Our multidisciplinary, theory-centred, practice-based approach offers students opportunities in experiential learning through industry-driven classroom projects, a compulsory internship programme, international and local competitions in communication campaigns and digital design, student-led public exhibitions of interactive digital work, student-led social media campaigns, service-based projects that collaborate with external clients, international student exchanges, and interactions with industry practitioners. With faculty members hailing from top communication, art, and design schools from around the world, bringing with them innovative methods of teaching, students benefit from an understanding of trends coupled with an eye on the evolving industry. Our Industry Advisory Board of top digital and media practitioners from the region shape our dynamic curriculum that is consistently ranked at the top by the industry.

With this multifaceted understanding of new media and communication, CNM graduates will be able to work in a wide spectrum of private corporations, public agencies, non-profit organisations and media related industries in policy formulation, advertising, public relations, social media management, corporate communication, organisational communication, media relations, media design, games design, health communication, journalism, creative industries, research and information management positions, among others. Our alums head social marketing portfolios of digital companies, head social marketing portfolios of financial organisations, head market research departments of top public opinion organisations, head advertising and public relations agencies, work in news and broadcast organisations, build their own successful start-ups, and play leadership roles in a wide range of public and non-profit organisations.

 

Entry Requirements

There are no formal pre-requisites or qualifying tests for entry into the department. We welcome students with a keen interest in the subject and who love interacting with new media and want to test their emotions and attitudes to technology through academic rigour and interdisciplinary learning and theory-driven practical problem solving. Students interested in learning effective ways to communicate and who want to be visually creative are also welcome.

 

Subject Requirements

Single Major [B.A.]

To major in NM, students need to:

  1. Pass NM1101E or NM1101X. This will be counted towards the Faculty Core or UE requirements.
  2. Pass at least 44 MCs of NM modules or NM-recognised modules which includes the following:
    1. NM2101
    2. NM2103
    3. NM2104
    4. NM3550Y (see Note 1)
    5. A minimum of 20 MCs from level-3000 modules or higher (inclusive of NM3550Y).
    6. A maximum of 2 level-4000 NM modules.
    7. A maximum of 8 MCs of NM-recognised modules.

Note:

  1. Students may read TR3202 (12 MCs) in place of NM3550Y.
  2. Level-5000 or NM modules are not allowed.
  3.  NM3550Y is only compulsory for FASS students. Non-FASS students must read other level-3000 or higher NM or NM-recognised modules in lieu of MN3550Y.

 

Single Major (B.Soc.Sci(Hons).)

To major in NM, students need to:

  1. Pass NM1101E or NM1101X. This will be counted towards the Faculty Core or UE requirements.
  2. Pass at least 84 MCs of NM or NM-recognised modules, which include the following:
    1. NM2101
    2. NM2103
    3. NM2104
    4. NM3550Y (see Note 1)
    5. A minimum of 20 MCs of level-3000 NM or NM-recognised modules or higher (inclusive of NM3550Y), with
    6. A minimum of 40 MCs from level-4000 or higher.
    7. A maximum of 2 level-5000 NM modules (subject to department’s approval).
    8. A maximum of 12 MCs of NM-recognised modules.

Note:

  1. Students may read TR3202 (12 MCs) in place of NM3550Y.
  2. NM3550Y is only compulsory for FASS students. Non-FASS students must read other level-3000 or higher NM or NM-recognised modules in lieu of MN3550Y.

 

Second Major

To major in NM, students need to:

  1. Pass NM1101E or NM1101X. This will be counted towards the Faculty Core or UE requirements.
  2. Pass at least 44 MCs of NM modules or NM-recognised modules which includes the following:
    1. NM2101
    2. NM2103
    3. NM2104
    4. NM3550Y (see notes 1 and 2)
    5. A minimum of 20 MCs from level-3000 modules or higher (inclusive of NM3550Y).
    6. A maximum of 2 level-4000 NM modules.
    7. A maximum of 8 MCs NM-recognised modules.

Note:

  1.  NM3550Y is only compulsory for FASS students. Non-FASS students must read other level-3000 or higher NM or NM-recognised modules in lieu of NM3550Y.
  2. FASS students may read TR3202 (12 MCs) in place of NM3550Y.
  3. Level-5000 or NM modules are not allowed.

 

Minor

Pass at least 24 MCs, which include the following:

  1. NM1101E or NM1101X
  2. NM2101
  3. 16 MCs of NM-coded modules, of which a minimum of 8 MCs must be at level-3000 or higher.
  • A maximum of 8 MCs from the minor can be used to satisfy the requirements of a major or another minor. However, the credits for these modules will be counted ONCE. FASS students will still need to fulfil the MCs required for the UE outside major requirements.

 

For the latest updates, please visit the Department website at: http://www.fas.nus.edu.sg/cnm