E-Resources on Plagiarism


It is important to note that plagiarism is an academic offence that is taken very seriously by the University, as stated in the NUS Code of Student Conduct.

NUS Code of Student Conduct (Clause 4)


The University takes a strict view of cheating in any form, deceptive fabrication, plagiarism and violation of intellectual property and copyright laws. Any student who is found to have engaged in such misconduct will be subject to disciplinary action by the University.

Source: NUS Office of Student Affairs website (http://www.nus.edu.sg/osa/documents/resources-and-policies/Code%20of%20Student%20Conduct%20(1Feb2017))


Statement on the NUS Code of Conduct


NUS students are expected to maintain and uphold the highest standards of integrity and honesty at all times, as well as embrace community standards, diversity and mutual respect for one another, both within the University and the wider Singapore community.

The Code of Student Conduct (published by the Office of Student Affairs) is intended to guide students' conduct in both the academic and non-academic aspects of their University life by providing an overview of the behavior generally expected of them as a member of the University community.

One of the fundamental principles on which this Code is based is that of "Academic, Professional, and Personal Integrity".

In this respect, it is important to note that all students share the responsibility for upholding the academic standards and reputation of the University. Academic honesty is a prerequisite condition in the pursuit and acquisition of knowledge.

Academic dishonesty is any misrepresentation with the intent to deceive or failure to acknowledge the source or falsification of information or inaccuracy of statements or cheating at examinations/tests or inappropriate use of resources. There are many forms of academic dishonesty and plagiarism is one of them. Plagiarism is generally defined as 'the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own' (The New Oxford Dictionary of English). The University does not condone plagiarism.

Students should adopt this rule - You have the obligation to make clear to the assessor which is your own work, and which is the work of others. Otherwise, your assessor is entitled to assume that everything being presented for assessment is being presented as entirely your own work. This is a minimum standard. In addition, the following guidelines will provide some assistance.

  • When using the ideas, phrases, paragraphs and data of others in work presented for assessment, such materials should be appropriately credited and acknowledged, so that it is clear that the materials being presented is that of another person and not the student's own.
  • The amount of detail required when referencing and acknowledging a source will vary according to the type of work and norms of the discipline. For instance,
    • Supervised examinations will require less detail in referencing and acknowledgement.
    • Papers written other than under examination conditions will require a full citation of all the sources utilised. While a particular style of citation is not prescribed, the citation should provide enough information for the reader to locate the sources cited.
    • Research materials (including texts, graphics and data) obtained from the internet or other electronic resources should be treated in the same way as research materials obtained from traditional sources.

    Any student found to have committed or aided and abetted the offence of plagiarism may be subject to disciplinary action. In addition, the student may receive no grade for the relevant academic assignment, project, or thesis; and he/she may fail or be denied a grade for the relevant subject or module. Such a student caught plagiarizing would have to take that module for grade and not be allowed to exercise the S/U option for that module.

    A student may not knowingly intend to plagiarise, but that should not be used as an excuse for plagiarism. Students should seek clarification from their instructors or supervisors if they are unsure whether or not they are plagiarising the work of another person.

    Source: NUS Registrar's Office website (http://www.nus.edu.sg/registrar/adminpolicy/acceptance.html)


    To ensure that students taking CELC courses understand what plagiarism is and how to avoid it, they are required to view the e-module entitled NUS Academic Culture module and read the articles listed below. Students will then have to take a quiz on plagiarism in the CELC module that they are taking.

    Academic Culture Module Click on the following link and view at least the two sections on "Plagiarism" and "Penalties": http://emodule.nus.edu.sg/ac/launch.htm

  • Go to Academic Ethics > Plagiarism
  • This section answers the questions:

    1. What is plagiarism?
    2. How can plagiarism be avoided?

  • Go to Academic Ethics > Penalties
  • This section answers the questions

    1. What happens when someone is caught for plagiarism?
    2. Does being found guilty of plagiarism mean expulsion from the University?

    Articles on Plagiarism

    Click on the links below and read the three articles on plagiarism.

  • "Plagiarism: What It Is and How to Recognize and Avoid It"
  • "Avoiding Plagiarism"
  • "Plagiarism and How to Avoid It"